In 1901, President William McKinley was shot and mortally wounded by anarchist Leon Czolgosz at the Pan-American Exposition in Buffalo, N.Y. (McKinley died eight days later; Czolgosz was executed on Oct. 29.)

In 1909, American explorer Robert Peary sent a telegram from Indian Harbor, Labrador, announcing that he had reached the North Pole five months earlier.

In 1943, 79 people were killed when a New York-bound Pennsylvania Railroad train derailed and crashed in Philadelphia.

In 1949, Howard Unruh, a resident of Camden, N.J., shot and killed 13 of his neighbors. (Found to have paranoid schizophrenia, Unruh was confined for the rest of his life; he died in a Trenton nursing home in 2009 at age 88.)

In 1972, the Summer Olympics resumed in Munich, West Germany, a day after the deadly hostage crisis that claimed the lives of 11 Israelis and five Arab abductors.

In 1985, all 31 people aboard a Midwest Express Airlines DC-9 were killed when the Atlanta-bound jetliner crashed just after takeoff from Milwaukee’s Mitchell Field.

In 1995, Baltimore Orioles shortstop Cal Ripken broke Lou Gehrig’s record by playing his 2,131st consecutive game.

In 1997, a public funeral was held for Princess Diana at Westminster Abbey in London, six days after her death in a car crash in Paris. In Calcutta, India, weeping masses gathered to pay homage to Mother Teresa, who had died the day before at age 87.

In 2002, meeting outside Washington, D.C., for only the second time since 1800, Congress convened in New York to pay homage to the victims of Sept. 11.

In 2003, Justine Henin-Hardenne won the all-Belgian women’s singles final at the U.S. Open, beating countrywoman Kim Clijsters, 7-5, 6-1.

In 2004, in Iraq, seven members of the First Marine Division from Camp Pendleton, Calif., and three U.S.-trained Iraqi soldiers were killed by a car bomb near Fallujah.

In 2006, President George W. Bush acknowledged for the first time that the CIA was running secret prisons overseas and said tough interrogation had forced terrorist leaders to reveal plots to attack the United States and its allies.

In 2009, the White House announced the resignation of President Barack Obama’s environmental adviser Van Jones, who’d become embroiled in a controversy over past inflammatory statements; Jones cited what he called a “vicious smear campaign” against him.

In 2014, President Barack Obama, in an interview taped for NBC’s “Meet the Press,” said the surge of immigrant children entering the U.S. illegally had changed the politics surrounding the issue of immigration and led him to put off a pledge to use executive action that could have shielded millions of people from deportation.

In 2017, Hurricane Irma, the most powerful hurricane ever recorded in the Atlantic, pounded Puerto Rico with heavy rain and powerful winds; authorities said more than 900,000 people were without power. (Hurricane Maria, which would destroy the island’s power grid, arrived two weeks later.) A California parole panel recommended parole for Leslie Van Houten, who at 19 was the youngest of Charles Manson’s murderous followers in 1969. (California Gov. Jerry Brown later blocked her release.)

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