Of all the cooking cultures that have put their own spin on schnitzel, this Israeli-inspired riff might be my favorite. No wonder; it comes from a new cookbook called “Sababa” (Avery), whose Tel Aviv-based author, Adeena Sussman, is a whiz at developing and adapting recipes with a modern sensibility.

Like kosher cooks in Israel have done for decades, she pan-fries the pounded-thin cutlets in oil instead of butter, and uses chicken instead of the classic Austrian call for veal. What makes Sussman’s recipe particularly appealing for a crunch fan like me is its seasoned blend of panko and roasted sesame seeds. The coating stays in place, thanks to a brief respite before the chicken hits the pan, and it reaches a golden brown apogee every time, right on cue, graced with the nutty goodness that sesame delivers.

This is not a fry to be afraid of, because a modest amount of oil is needed. From my measured testing, just a few tablespoons are actually absorbed. This is non-greasy schnitzel, folks!

You can buy chicken thighs that are already boned and skinless or use the bone-in, skin-on variety. It takes about 5 minutes to prep them, with the added bonus of reserving the bones for homemade stock and the skin for savory gribenes.

Get today’s top stories right in your inbox. Sign up for our daily morning newsletter.

Load comments