100 YEARS AGO\ From the Greensboro Evening Telegram, Aug. 11-17, 1899

A second mining operation has been started in Guilford County.The Chifar Consolidated Gold Mine Company began crushing ore at a mine a half mile south of the depot in Gibsonville.

John Farlow, superintendent of the mines, said the prospects for a great financial success were bright.

Four shafts ranging in depth from 30 to 55 feet already have been sunk, and the ore is solid all the way.

The gold mine opening follows the announcement last week that the Fentress copper mine near Pleasant Garden has been sold to Northern capitalists, who plan to develop it soon.

Two men attempted a highway robbery of D.A. Kirkpatrick as he rode back to Greensboro Sunday night from a preaching at Pleasant Garden. But when one of the men grabbed the bridle of the buggy's horse, the animal started snorting and pawing, causing the man to jump back. The horse then sprinted forward, thus ending the would-be holdup. The two men are believed to be the same ones who broke into two homes near Pleasant Garden Sunday morning while their occupants were at church. ... Capt. J.W. Fry has been elected to the Greensboro Board of Aldermen, to succeed M.L. Shields, who resigned. ... Work is expected to commence in September at a cotton mill being established in High Point.

With ore coming in from Chatham County and trainloads of coke arriving from Virginia, the Empire Steel and Iron Works in Greensboro will soon be at full capacity. ... George A. Kestler has purchased the Southern Sweet Gum plant and expects to be producing chewing gum in the Greensboro plant in early September. ... A.W. Curtis, a graduate of A. & M. College in Greensboro, has received an appointment as principal of the agricultural department of the A. & M. College in West Virginia at a salary of $800 plus lodging.

Mosquito netting: Frame, hangers and net, complete and ready to put up, $1.75.

For the bedroom: N.J. McDuffie has solid oak bedroom suites, $10.

Store building for rent: Groome store, South Elm Street, $16.67 month.

75 YEARS AGO

From the Greensboro Daily News, Aug. 11-17, 1924

One hundred and fifty students already have enrolled at the new High Point College, and it is expected this number will climb to 200 by the time registration is held Sept. 8-9.

Two dormitories - one for women, one for men - will be complete and ready for occupancy, school officials said.

Only courses in the first two years of college work will be offered this year, along with preparatory work in the 10th and 11th grades. Next year, junior work will be added, and then senior courses will be included in the curriculum in 1926.

The Rev. R.M. Andrews, the college's president, has moved to High Point from Greensboro and will hold his first faculty meeting Sept. 1.

The college is being built by the North Carolina Methodist Protestant churches and will be affiliated with the church.

The new cast iron water main connecting Greensboro's pumping plant with Reedy Fork reservoir seven and a half miles away is in place and is being tested section by section. ... The county school board and the county commissioners have compromised on their money differences. The school board wanted the school tax raised from 37 cents at present to 40 cents, but the commissioners opposed. Under the agreement, the school board will use every possible economy to keep spending down, and the commissioners will keep the tax rate at 37 cents but will borrow money to meet any deficit if there is one. ... A crowd of 1,000 to 1,500 turned out at Fisher Park for a concert by the Greensboro Municipal Band. As a special feature, there was a solo by Fred Phipps, who has been studying with a voice teacher in New York.

Store building for rent: Store at the corner of Spring Street and Walker Avenue, $40 per month.

For the bedroom: Johnson-Forbis-Simmons Co. has five-piece mahogany bedroom suite, $377.50.

Car for sale: Gate City Motor has Studebaker Light Six coupe, $1,395.

50 YEARS AGO

From the Greensboro Daily News, Aug. 11-17, 1949

A report by Sales Management magazine says Greensboro's 21,400 families last year had ``spendable' income - i.e., net after taxes - of $6,078 on average. This amounted to $1,646 per individual, the magazine said.

These figures compared favorably with the United States as a whole. Nationwide, the magazine reported, the net family income was $4,531, and per capita income was $1,289.

In the South Atlantic states, the per capita income was $1,030, and in North Carolina it was $927.

The magazine's study also found that business done by Greensboro retail stores totaled $110,078,000.

The staff of the Guilford County Department of Public Welfare has grown to 38, a number needed to meet the greatest demand the department has ever known, according to Mrs. Blanche Carr Sterne, superintendent. ... With an antenna finally in place atop the 450-foot tower, WFMY-TV will begin telecasting test patterns in about two weeks. ... A proposed 256-unit public housing project on a 43-acre tract off Benbow Road has run into opposition from property owners of the area, who said the project should be developed elsewhere rather than disrupt one of the best Negro residential areas in the city.

An economic shot in the arm from the recent Southern Furniture Market and a seasonal upswing in the hosiery industry are lowering unemployment in High Point. Ralph Miller, manager of the Employment Security Commission office in High Point, said applications for unemployment pay were down 6.2 percent in July. He estimated total unemployment in the city now at 2,500. ... Greensboro High School coach Bob Jamieson has been elected president of the North Carolina Coaches Association.

Store building for rent: Grocery store and service station seven miles westof Greensboro on U.S. 421; rent is 1 cent per gallon on gas or $35 per month.

For the bedroom: Rhodes Furniture has oak bedroom suite of panel bed, chest and dresser, $169.95.

Car for sale: Greensboro Motor Co. has Buick six-passenger, four-door sedan, $2,017.

25 YEARS AGO

From the Greensboro Daily News, Aug. 11-17, 1974

A large section of Northwest Guilford County will be opened to development as a result of a $1,987,500 grant from the Environmental Protection Agency announced this week.

The grant will be used for the Horsepen Creek sewer project. When that project is completed, sewer service will be available in a 10,000-acre area bounded by Interstate 40 on the south, Westridge Road on the east, Battleground Road/U.S. 220 on the north and Inman Road on the west.

Much of that land is not now developable because it is unsuitable for septic tanks.

The project provides for 20,500 feet of sewer outfall line, a 1.4-million gallon capacity sewer lift station, a 4,800-foot force main and a 5,800-foot water main.

The federal grant will cover 75 percent of the cost, with state and local funds making up the balance.

The High Point school board has dropped plans, at least temporarily, for a new Johnson Street elementary school and new junior high school because the county commissioners did not provide the $3.25 million needed. ... More than 123 courses, including new offerings in engineering and driver's and safety education, will be available through the Graduate School of A&T State University beginning July 26. ... Southern Life Insurance Company now has $811 million insurance in force after a strong first half of 1989, during which insurance in force rose 42 percent, company president W.L. Carter Jr. reported.

John G. Patseavouras, a well-known High Point Republican, has been named director of the newly-created Division of Adult Probation and Paroles within the state Department of Corrections. ... Guilford County and Greensboro schools will open for the new school year August 22.

Store building for rent: Four-room house on South Chapman Street, adaptable to store or office use, $125 month.

For the bedroom: Rhodes Furniture has four-piece oak bedroom suite, $199.

Car for sale: Leith Lincoln-Mercury has four-door Mercury Marquis Brougham, $6,375.

10 YEARS AGO

From the News & Record, Aug. 11-17, 1989

It's two down and 98 to go.

Voters in March 1988 approved a bond issue to protect the Greensboro and High Point water supplies, including buying land around the lakes where the water is stored.

To date, Guilford County and the city of Greensboro have bought two tracts and are negotiating to buy 98 more parcels around the city's three lakes - Townsend, Brandt and Higgins.

Voters authorized spending up to $25 million for the ambitious water protection plan that includes buying land around the lakes and building filtering ponds around High Point's Oak Hollow Lake and City Lake.

Burglars struck at 215 Greensboro homes in July, a 36 percent increase over July 1988. Detective Sam Jones attributes much of the increase to drug use, noting that the things burglars most often taken are items they can sell or trade easily at illegal drug houses. ... David Hudgins, a member of Greensboro to Alleviate Smoking Pollution, said his group has about 10,000 signatures on petitions seeking a referendum on banning smoking in retail areas. ... The new Wendover Avenue-Interstate 40 interchange will be completed by early October, state highway officials say.

Seaboard Chemical Corp. of High Point has been fined more than $12,000 after an inspection by the state Department of Labor that was spurred by employee complaints about unsafe working conditions. Inspectors said they found a number of safety violations. ... A regional farmers market for the Piedmont Triad will be delayed for at least another year. The General Assembly appropriated $500,000, but promoters of the market say at least $2 million is needed to get it going.

Store building for rent: 1000-square-foot retail-antiques-office space in Liberty on Greensboro telephone exchange, $250 per month.

For the bedroom: Colfax Furniture has five pieces of cherry bedroom suite for $1,740.

Car for sale: City Motors has a four-door Mazda 929, $19,995.

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